Dancing with the Green Fairy

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Absinthe with it’s natural green color has been referred to as the Green Fairy. This anise-flavoured spirit is made from the flowers and leaves of wormwood, green anise, sweet fennel and other herbs,  and because of it’s high alcohol level is normally diluted with water. With a slightly bitter taste, it is often  poured into a glass of water over a sugar cube on a perforated spoon, some of which were elaborately designed for this purpose.
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Absinthe was said to be both a narcotic and an aphrodisiac. It was adopted by the bohemian Parisian culture of authors and artists who claimed that it stimulated  creativity. Absinthe’s legends caused it to be banned in most of Europe and North America. It took nearly a century before it’s reputation could be restored. In 1988, France lifted its ban on absinthe, but it wasn’t marketed under its real name again until 1998. Studies have proven that the ingredients have never been hallucinogenic, but it’s effects were due to the fact that it is 140 proof. Absinthe doesn’t come cheap, priced at about seventy dollars a bottle. Absinthe’s long past is the stuff of legend whether true or not.

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http://www.absinth.com/

 

Fairy Tale Palm Paintings

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Based on the fairy tales of famous writers like Hans Christian Andersen, Russian artist Svetlana Kolosova paints works of art on the palm of her hand.

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Svetlana Kolosova has always has always appreciated the arts, but taking care of her children and running a household  left her little time to concentrate on her passion. Without the time to work on detailed oil paintings, she replaced oil paint for watercolors and inspired by the stories she had read to her children, she started painting fairy tale-inspired artworks on the most convenient canvas she could think of – her left palm. Except through photography these images are short lived. As of yet no original palm paintings have been sold.

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Paint Injected Bubble Wrap

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The perfect stress reliever. Bubble wrap exists so that people can pop them. Suprisingly there is another thing you can do with it: make art. Bradley Hart, has taken packing material to an entirely new level. Originally he painted discarded materials with the exterior of bubble wrap creating abstract artworks, his newest pieces have him injecting each bubble with paint.

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Hart’s newest works are unusual in the way that each bubble is used as an individual pixel. Like using colored tiles, but instead injecting each bubble with paint to create an image. There is one of Steve Jobs, and another of a  street scene in Amsterdam. Each image when complete, is made up of shiny bubbles of color.

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Hart’s work transforms consumerism into contemporary art, while doing so gives us a new way in which to view the time we live in.

http://www.bradleyhart.ca/GalleryMain.asp?GalleryID=114452&AKey=5BDJN8BK

Play Dough Sculptures in Tin Cans by Miriam Jonas

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In the times we now live the distinction between sacred and what is blasphemy walks a fine line. Berlin-based artist Miriam Jonas creates relief portraits of clerics inside tin-cans using a very unusual medium, Play-Doh. The result is a colorful version of art you might find hidden in the corner of a large place of worship.  It’s an interesting  topic just as the catholic church transitions to a new Pope.

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All of her work is thought provoking, with its use of bright color and forms and makes us question what we consider normal.

Polka Popes, a large wall installation by Jonas, is made up of a series of fictional Play-Doh portraits of popes inside empty fish tin cans. They are a satirical look at consumer culture and the modern church, reducing larger than life figures into products ready for consumption. The fish cans are a reference to traditional Christian symbols.

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http://www.miriamjonas.de/Miriam%20Jonas/Polka%20Popes.html

Barbie Dolls and Action Figures as Art


Freya Jobbins: Sculptor. Inspired as she is by other artists such as Guiseppe Archimboldo’s fruit & vegie paintings, Ron Mueck’s big big humans, Gunther Von Hagen’s plastinated corpses and the Toy Story Trilogy, their influence and her need to ‘build’ can be seen in Freya’s current sculptural work.

Working with plastic (pre-loved that is) to re-construct the humanoid form in her assemblages is Freya’s obsession. Having an A type personality, loving miniature detail and symmetry and a new love of Greek mythology, results in some very provocative, humorous and disturbing works.